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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I'm also looking for long-haired mice, anywhere in the US as well. I've become just that desperate. :lol: It seems like there are no breeders of exotic mice anywhere even close to where I live (MA), so if you have any at all that you'd be willing to sell to me (male or female - name your price and I'll see what I can do), then please, please let me know!

Otherwise I will have to wait until Rodentfest which I think is in October, which is when I'll be very busy, so I may not even be able to attend (it also depends on if my lovely boyfriend will put up with being dragged along, hehe). Thanks, all! :)
 

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Hairless are very hard to find in the US. I've been looking for some for a while. :p

I've had to settle for hairless rats, which are much more common. :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Aww, I've seen quite a few hairless rats in petshops. I just don't understand it - I know there are hairless mice out there and that they have existed even before hairless guinea pigs, which I have even seen in an ordinary Petco once. Where are the little buggers? :( We must find them!
 

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They're difficult to breed, and keep. And there's not a huge market for them outside of the mouse world, so that's half the reason they're rare. :p

But good luck! If you find anyone with some, let me know! :lol:
 

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You could try reptile expos. They have all kinds of little critters that are meant for feeders, and some people do feed only hairless. Last expo I was at had tri's, I'm really upset I didnt buy one or two. :( (they were being sold as pets, not feeders)
 

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Try California- there seem to be more shows out there, and a mouse train could always bring them out this way...I might be able to take them a bit east..Not sure, my transmission is going out.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Rasputin - aww, they are difficult to breed and keep? :(

Erica - that's an interesting idea, I never would have thought of that. I have no idea where I would find one around here, though.

Neurozool - if only I wasn't on the other side of the country! :|
 

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They're not too bad. Just more difficult than your average mouse.
They need more warmth, and from what I've heard shouldn't be kept alone because they can get chilled, and die.
They have immune problems, so they can get very sick easily.
And as far as breeding goes, with hairless, you can't breed hairless to hairless, and get more hairless. You have to breed a hairless male to a normal female, THEN either breed two of the babies together, or breed one of the babies back to dad.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
Really? How strange about the breeding! I think I've heard that about SCID mice, but not hairless in general.

I found this last night: http://www.criver.com/EN-US/PRODSERV/BYTYPE/RESMODOVER/RESMOD/Pages/SKH1Mouse.aspx. It says the mouse is immunocompetent and euthymic, so that means its totally normal when it comes to the immune system. Then again, I have to keep in mind that there is probably 0% chance I could ever acquire one from that place. :cry:

I think I heard something about them having skin problems too. Hmm, what happens if you DO breed hairless to hairless? Do the babies have hair?
 

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This post is a bunch of crap. I found this by accident and it has so much false crap. Hairless mice are super easy to breed. I have been breeding them for a long time and they are just like other mice except for a couple things. They need a varied diet of nuts and seeds because they burn lots of energy. If this is not provided they will eat the young. You can breed hairless males to hairless females. Somtimes they will take care but some may not lactate. So to solve that problem you just keep them with heterozygous females so they can get some help. You also don't use pine chipes because it ruins the eyes. I use aspen. I started with 2 hairless males and now have hundreds of hairless that I have crossed out several times producng hets so to not inbreed. My mice are healthy strong and no problem breeding. If people are having problems with them they are just probably inbred garbage because I have not had problems ever.

Baby hairless texel getting ready to go into final stages of hair loss.


Sometimes they keep a little hair. This will fall out eventually.


Heterozygous texel. I have bred this into all my hairless genes. So I get either hairles, rex, or texel from my hairless males.
 

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Sheesh. Not a good way to use your first post . . .

Sidenote: The hairless mice I found in Kentucky, aren't available right now. But should be in a few months.
 

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love the pictures,especially the first and thanks for sharing the info.It's a forum requirement Martenfisher that you post in the introductions before posting elsewhere,thanks.
 

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Also, mortality rate in hairlessXhairless litters, depends on the strain of hairless you have.

I am unfamiliar as to weather there are many hairless strains in the US or not.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
martenfisher -- Thank you for your pictures! I was honestly under the impression that there were a couple different types of hairless mice, though - the type that has hair and then loses it, and then the ones that are completely hairless. Am I right about that, or am I getting confused with hairless guinea pigs (because that is certainly the case with them)? Do you live anywhere near Massachusetts, USA? I would be more than willing to drive out of state to purchase some of yours, if so. :D

This post is a bunch of crap. I found this by accident and it has so much false crap.
People were just sharing what they knew, though. :?

Also, you should never use Pine or Cedar for small animal bedding, ever. ;)

Now I am very curious as to whether there are different "types" of hairless mice out there.
 

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we have different types over here but still we all seem to be in the dark about the actual genetic side.Mine don't ever have whiskers where as most seem to retain whiskers or have curly ones.I find that breeding hairless x hairless to often produces mice with eye problems.Large and bulging eyes.It's ok for one or two generations in the strain I have.They don't start with hair and lose it either,they are born hairless.I've never seen a mouse like the first picture,shame they don't stay that way,I like it.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
I love the mouse in the second picture of martenfisher's. I wish there was a 'hairless' type that would stay like that. I think it's really cute!

SarahC -
I find that breeding hairless x hairless to often produces mice with eye problems.Large and bulging eyes.
But I love big bulgy eyes! :lol: Just curious, what exactly is wrong with eyes that turn out this way?
 
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