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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Okay so, I haven't been on in a long while, but as of now I have two mice in a conjoined large cage. They have been together since about Sept. and no real problems. But, a couple nights ago I noticed some squeaking in the night, thought it was because my fat mouse, Butters, was sitting on Zen as she cleaned her, but now I look and Zen is loosing hair where Butters has been biting/ licking her.

My question is is it better to keep them together or should I just separate the two conjoined cages? I don't want them getting lonely but I'd rather not have them getting hurt. Also, I was thinking if I conjoined the cages I could put the large mouse I have, Butters, on a diet because. I just need some opinions because I'm lost here. :(

Sincerely to all who reply,
Sara
 

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It sounds like barbering. Are they both does?

To be honest I would leave them together if they are both female as they would probably prefer to have company and be overgroomed than fully furred and lonely. Unless you show barbering isn't a major problem. As for the fat mouse, diets in the sense that humans mean probably won't have much effect (mice don't overeat like people and rats). The best thing to do is re-evaluate the diet you feed to them both and the amount they can exercise inside their cage.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Yeah they are both girls, and that's what I figured because they spend a lot of time together and it would be sad to have them apart.

As for the fat mouse, I read online that if they have too much protein they can get open sores. Butters, the big mouse, is getting red spots when you look under her fur. She's a really good mouse, not paranoid or anything, she just sits with you when you take her out. I want to bring her to the vet since I don't want her to be unhealthy, but my dad said if I get her a diet then the other one would get like anorexic looking, since she is so little.

I mean, I buy "Vita rat, mouse & gerbil formula" and now that I look at it it says vitamin & mineral enriched and HIGH PROTEIN FORMULATION. Do you think I should go to the animal clinic with the fat mouse, get a diet formula, or just buy new feed?

Thank you very much for helping me, having you here to answer my questions is very reassuring and makes me feel a lot better about what to do.

Sara
 

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I'd recommend making your own food mix, but I'll come to that in a moment. I am concerned about the red spots you have described. I wonder if they are a reaction to protein ('hot spots'), injury or a case of mites. Can you describe them for us?

As to the diet, making your own is always the best way if you can. I use bruised oats, rolled barley, mixed wild bird seed, dog complete kibble and broken dog biscuits. Foods to avoid for your mice for now would include cat or kitten food, ferret food, and wheat. The proportions of your ingredients will also be important - for example there's no point carefully selecting a dog food with a fairly low protein level and then making it 50% of your mix, thus raising the overall level too much. The thinner mouse can always be given fattier foods as treats when she's out of the cage away from her friend.
 

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I'm wondering why you recommend against feeding wheat to meeces? Or is just to her meeces, because of the red spots?
 

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Yes, it was in reference to the red spots. However we need to determine what they are before the solution can be found.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Okay well at first I didn't notice them because they are under her fur. When I cleaned the cages one day I noticed something on her side, that looked like a small cut or bite mark perhaps [from the other mouse I figured] but under closer examination, she has little red dots or scabs I guess I could say, on her back below her ear, and even a couple by her face now, by her whisker and even her eye . I'm getting worried because the one on her side that was barely noticeable a couple days ago is now an open sore.

I told my sister after looking it up online. she talked to this girl who works at a vet clinic and she said to put neosporin on it... My mouse just licks it off. I've only put it on a few times but the hole thing in her side is looking much worse. :cry: I put it on her again and have been holding her and looking at her cuts while writing this to give as best a description as possible while making sure she doesn't just lick off the neo.

I don't know, I'm really worried about this and am not totally sure how to handle it right now, I read on the site that I found this site off of that if she is in pain I shouldn't let her suffer, but I am willing to do what I can to help her get better, if at all possible.

Sara
 

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Can you post a photo? This might help. I agree with the advice to put neosporin on it if you can do your best to prevent it being licked off. However you need to address the cause. If you have treated for mites (?) then it's likely to be a reaction to too much protein or an allergy (it can also be a reaction to mites, where the mouse scratches itself). I would treat for mites to be sure that's not the cause, if you haven't already, and alter the diet to remove typical problem foods. If that seems to help you can add foods back into the mix one by one until you find the one you need to avoid.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Well I can't really get a good picture. Next time I put neosporin on her should I take the pictures before or after? The only real difference is that her fur sticks with the neo. where do I get the things for the food mix to make? I've been giving them more lettuce and craisens.. But if it were mites does that mean the other mouse in the cage would have them too?

I really do appreciate your help.

Thanks again.

Sara
 

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Take the photos before you apply anything, so it looks as it does without intervention. As I said before, if you haven't treated for mites do so now; you will have to treat all mice living in that cage and thoroughly clean and disinfect the cage and any toys etc. As for the food, my advice would be to cut out common allergens such as nuts and seeds and reduce the amount of overall protein. If this begins to show signs of helping then you can gradually introduce one thing back in at a time and discover where the problem lies. Supermarkets and health food shops as well as pet shops sell many suitable ingredients.

Oh, and it would be advisable to stop giving lettuce. It has little nutritional value and can cause stomach upsets in mice (and other rodents). I have no idea what craisins are... sounds like the evil lovechild of cranberries and raisins :lol:
 
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