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Hi Everyone!

I was re-reading my mouse books last night and a couple of the authors (who were successful breeders at the time) say that a show quality Champagne tends to be homozygous for blue as well as chocolate and dove (aa bb dd pp) to get the delicate shade required and avoid being too brown - is this still true? Also, can anyone post pictures of really good champagnes?

Sarah xxx
 

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Champagne is a difficult colour to photograph accurately so here are a couple of examples:

BIS cham doe without flash


Same doe taken with flash


A different BIS champagne
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Those are beautiful Cait, thank you :)

It's definately aa bb dd pp - pink eyed lilac - that Tony Cooke reckoned makes the best show champagne, I just wondered if that had changed in the last 40 years since the book was written lol. Obviously it has :p He said the dilute gene makes the champagne more pale and subtle.

Sarah xxx
 

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There are two schools of thought, with respected and successful breeders on either side. The first one is that you should put silvers (i.e. PE blue) into your chams to alter the colour as you have described. The other, which I agree with even though I've never bred chams myself, is that you shouldn't put any blue dilution into chams as you want them to keep a nice warm colour. All I can say on that one is, go to a show and talk to people who have bred winning chams recently and see what they do! The two above belong to Heather McLean (who's on this forum) and Dave Safe, so when you come to a show there's your first two people to talk to.
 

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I've never bred champagnes myself, but I was told by a succesful breeder that the best show quality champagnes are usually homozygous for dilute. My guess is that you can get good champagnes both ways: from D/* by selecting for a paler, subtler shade, and from d/d by selecting for a warmer shade.

My 2c.
 
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