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Satin and longhair are both recessive, which means they have two copies of the gene for it to show (one from each parent). If you breed a satin to a longhair, assuming they are homozygous, the litter will all be normal coated mice but carry satin and longhair. If you then breed babies together they have a one in sixteen chance of producing a baby that is both satin and longhair.
 

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I'm playing devil's advocate here, but I have to ask--why do you want satin longhair mice anyway?

Satin results in partially hollow hairs (which is why the light can shine through them and make them shiny), and angora/longhair elongates the hairs which means they break just a little bit easier, especially if they're satin and hollow. What this amounts to is that angora satins (especially females) are often indistinguishable from plain satins. So if you had a bunch of angora satins, you might not necessarily even know it.

Here's a pet-type mouse of mine that I bred a few years ago who was angora satin:



You wouldn't be able to tell she was angora by looking at her but both her parents were and all her siblings were.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
hmm maybe it just depends on the genes? because ive seen some really nice looking long haired satins before. maybe they are just difficult to get right? i was just going to breed long haired mice but i really like how satin look on them so i thought i would try it out. maybe they will end up looking like normal satin. and if they do then i'll just go for regular satin and regular long hairs :p
 
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