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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Here are a couple updated pics of the two litters of mice fathered by my red guy:

Red X black:

(three sooty/umbrous reds pictured)

Rex X cinnamon:

(2 cinnamon, 1 red pictured)

Dad:


The original breeder in Europe told me to hang on to the sooty/umbrous reds from the red X black pairing and cross back to the dad to see if that helps bring back the rich red color. I'm going to try that, but I'm not crossing them into the "main line" of reds for at least a few more generations to make sure I don't lose the gorgeous color.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
A doe.

I've never bred a red doe, preferring instead to breed the cinnamon sisters, but if she seems otherwise healthy at 8-12 weeks, I may cross her back to her father.

Neither of the red males I have are the least bit fat, and they're around 14 weeks old now, so we'll see.

The red X black litter gave me babies with better type but poor color and the red X cinnamon litter was the opposite. I'm wondering if I can't "find the balance" and cross the two, but I'm keeping most of the original reds pure for the time being anyway, at least until they make it out to other people and are more widely kept. I wouldn't want to be the only person in this part of the country with reds, and ruin them all. :p
 

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Those are some gorgeous babes you have there, such super colours. :D
Will the colours develop more as they become older or will they stay as they are? Sorry if it's a daft question but my Stone doe has just had a moult and her colour is much darker now, she now also has developed a white nose, tail root and gone white behind the ears- I'm assuming no good for showing but looks pretty cute (it's just as well she's only a pet) :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
How young, though? I've heard from 6 weeks to 8 weeks to 12 weeks as the earliest age for red does. I think six weeks might be pushing it, but I can try 8 weeks I think.
 

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Rhasputin said:
I wouldn't do 6 weeks. You should definitely play it safe, since you don't have many of these guys. :p
Red mice aren't like the mice you keep.

The reason for breeding a red doe before normal breeding age is to "play it safe." Dominant Yellow mice often get obese and have other issues and breeding problems. That is why it is suggested to breed them younger than you would normally breed any other doe.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
I've also heard that show breeders in the UK, Finland and the Netherlands breed them continuously (back-to-back) in order to ensure continued fertility. My gut instinct is that this would be harmful, but it's apparently only a couple litters, then they're retired.

It's weird having a variety who "breeds differently" than the others. :p
 

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I don't recall anything about back to back litters, but i don't imagine only doing it once (one litter born, pregnant straight after) would harm the mommies too mum, i know you feed your girlies well.
 

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SarahC is the best person to ask, since she breeds fawns :) I reckon she'll say breed at 8-10 weeks old.

Oh, and a note to the poster who mentioned the stone developing white and being no good for showing - you can't show stone in the UK anyway, it's not a standardised colour ;)
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Here are some more updated pictures. You can really see the difference in color now.

Red X black:




Red X cinnamon:



And since somebody asked for proof of their undercoat (they thought they were chocolates) :p
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
Yeah, they vary as much as chocolate from a deep, reddish brown (what the standards call for) to a light, washed-out color that almost looks beige (which is found in petstore stock). But from a show standpoint I would rather have a took dark, too-evenly ticked animal than a too-light animal with clumps of ticking on the spine (for example). If you were showing cinnamons you'd want them to be a bit redder than some of these are, too--in pictures they do look almost chocolate. They also don't have very good type, which is related to the fact that they're red-related. But they'll be good for breeding more reds as I know they carry nothing at all and have all the pheomelanins needed for good reds.
 
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