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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
Last night I was greeted by chorus of cheeping that made me turn until I located them. Some tri does hardly show at all before throwing their litter.

I also havve four pinkies by Nibbles off of Nora. I wish the litter were bigger, but along with the first set of six, I'll hopefully be able to figure out a couple of things about the whole tri/transgenic genetic order. Nibs is a bold black to beige tri. Nora is a yellow splashed tri doe.

Pictures at 10.
 

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Discussion Starter · #4 ·
Pix of the little family:





I had to fiddle with the contrast and brightness on these, apologies for the starkness. Oh, what the heck it really brings out old Oddball's eyes...this shows how those looked before..



whoa! i just previewed these and for a minute I thought I'd posted the same picture twice...
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't think so; his other litter off a different doe had none. I think that sort of thing is just a freak of nature. It could have something to do with the wierd tri/transgenic genes. You will notice that his face is full strength fawn on the side with the black eye and pale yellow on the side with the white eye; I'm not sure that that is a coincidence.
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
The main thing that happens in tris is that colors that are supposed to be diluted on the parts where there's color reverts to darker shades. A marked black that would be normally black and white becomes a white, black, brown, beige, and bone mouse with patches of different colors. the yellow or fawn becomes orange, yellow, cream and white. The eyes are sometimes diluted from black to ruby, and, I suspect, in a red-eyed or pink eyed mouse, there may be reversion to the the black eyes. Without white markings, a tri looks streaked, splashed or painted with the palette of colors from full strength to pale.

There is so much going on genetically, and it's not a stable or predictable thing, in my opinion. I am just beginning to get a clue or two what's going on, and the more I learn the weirder it seems.
 

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Discussion Starter · #14 ·
Thanks; I really love seeing a favorite buck turn out to be such a fine father. Watching the little families interact is a real treat for me, especially in a case like Nibbles and Nora, who have their first litter still in with them, though boys will be removed in about a week or so. I think that young bucks or kittens benefit from it and are more likely to also be good fathers. I'm always nervous leaving a buck in on his first litter, but it has always worked out for me and my meeces. The only time a buck ever destroyed a litter it was one who broke out of his cage and broke into a tank with one week old babies, and no buck in. It was shocking; the doe obviously had fought for her babies, but they were all gone, and she was injured. If I had kept the father ink, maybe the other buck would not have even tried to get in and do what he did.
 

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Discussion Starter · #15 ·
Updated photos of Oddball's and Oma's litter at about two weeks with captions:

"Hey kids! Let's play Twister!"


"Psst! Our dad is a weirdo."


"Geez, how embarrassing; I can't take you kids anywhere."
 

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Discussion Starter · #19 ·
Yes, it's in there...I don't breed for it, but there it is anyway. I'm wondering if there's not a long coat on a couple of them that look kind of mussed and roughish.
 
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