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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This is a really simple drawing... but it gets the point across.



Basicly, there are two plastis containers, one flat, and one tall.
You cut or burn a small hole in the sides of both, making SURE that the hole on the tall container, is as high up as possible. Then hook them together with a hose, or tube. You can make the holes air tight around the tube/hose by covering the edges with a layer of electrical tape, and hot glue.

The mice go in the flat container, on the left with a lid. And on the right, you put about half an inch, to an inch deep of baking soda.
Slowly pour white vinegar into the tall chamber in stages. Each time, pour a little, then close the top, pour a little, close the top, waiting for the bubbles to go down, each time. This is why you put the hole up HIGHER on the chemical reaction side. Otherwise, you'd have vinegar covered mice.

Works the same as the gas tanks, but it's a bit cheaper, and easier to put together.
I'm sure if I were culling large amounts of mice, I might want to have something a bit more professional. But this works for my ammount. :)

This also allows you to slowly produce the CO2 gas. Which keeps your mice from feeling much pain. When you gas them very quickly, the mouse feels pain, before the anesthetic effects of the CO2 can take place. By slowly filling the 'mouse-side' with gas, the mice slowly slip unconscious, and then die.

Make sure that the mice have all stopped breathing/moving 100% before you open the container. If not, the mouse has a chance of reviving, and having extreme brain damage. And that is not good for either you, or the mouse.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Well you have to keep an eye on the mice. Every so often you have to put a little bit more vinegar in, and close the lid, let the bubbles settle, then put more vinegar in, close the lid, etc. Once they stop moving completely, they're gonners.

I had -ONE- mouse out of a large batch, that I missed, and it was awful. He was hidden beneith another mouse, and I hadn't realized he was still breathing a little.... ):
I'm not going to go into detail about that. But I can assure you, after it happened once, I'm making sure it will NEVER happen again.

I have a weird fear of anything under pressure, so using a C02 tank scares me out of my mind, lol.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Works the same way with dry ice. :p

But i don't know about where you live, but here you have to be 18, show ID, bring your own cooler, and buy a large amount. And it's not cheap, lol.
I have no idea if that's just virginia law, or what, but it's so hard to -find- it first, and then it's hard to -get- it. :p
 

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I don't like to use things under pressure, either. Even just using the compressed air to clean out my computer fans scares me. :p So I really like this.

My only question though - in the other CO2 tutorial it says to have a small hole in the mouse chamber, so that the oxygen can be pushed out as the gas enters. Do you do the same?
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I don't put a hole in the main container. Simply because the plastic box isn't air tight, so the oxygen can seep out of the edges. :)

This method works good with dry ice, too. I found some fore really cheap at a grocery store and tried it out. I think I prefer it over the baking soda and vinegar, but it's harder to find, and I feel like it's a waste since I have to buy it in like 2 pound blocks, but only use a small piece to cull the mice.
 

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How long time does this take for you to cull in this box?
 

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not sure if anyone mentioned it yet but very young/young mice need to be exposed and left for longer in any chamber as they are very good at holding their breath and take a bit longer to succumb to the gas, i like your idea of this chamber, it might be easier than getting hold of a huge cylinder of co2, for me anyways :p
 

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Does the freezer have to be turned down at all, or is it just your standard household freezer? I'm assuming that because they are so small that it doesn't take very long... but I'm cautious of doing it that way.
 

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Just wanted to say, I used this set up just a couple days ago, and I was pleased with how it worked. Dry ice works well, but is a huge pain to have to deal with, so I thought I'd give the baking soda/vinegar a try. There didn't seem to be any distress, just gradually sleepy mice. It took longer the first time because I was still figuring out pouring amounts and everything, but the next time it was about 3-5 min between first pour of vinegar and the stopping of movement in the mice. I didn't time it exactly though.
 

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Discussion Starter · #20 ·
Yeah, if you introduce the gas slowly, the mice slow down, lay down, and pass out. They do gasp when they're out and dying, but they're unconcious the whole time that starts happening (if you've done it right).

Just a note, sometimes if you use the gas chamber with ASFs they keep trying to breath, while unconcious, for longer than normal mice. What i like to do is if I have a load of mice and ASFs, after the mice have stopped breathing i pump up the ammount of CO2 to make sure the ASFs are completely dead first, before taking everyone out.

Rats go down very quickly, possibly more quickly than mice.
 
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