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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
My two magpies that I reared when someone brought them in to our vet practice:



That's them at around 5 weeks of age, they are a few months old now and a lot bigger! Midge is on the left and Mags on the right. Unfortunately Midge died over the weekend :(
 

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Handsome birds - even though I am not keen on seeing them in large numbers (as I do like a diverse population of garden birds), you have to admire how successful they are as a species. Were they very difficult to hand rear?
 

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They weren't really - luckily their proper parents had done most of the work before someone 'rescued' them. We fed them on dog surgery recovery diet, with copious quantities of mealworms and seeds thrown in for good measure.

On RSPB advice, I can't release them into the wild once they have been hand reared - but I knew that when I started rearing them. So Mags lives in a nice big aviary out the back (which was conveniently there when I moved into this flat!) and wears falconry jesses so I can carry him about without risk of him flying off!
 

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Is it hard to keep him stimulated, as corvids are such intelligent birds? I always wanted Mortimer the Raven as a child (anyone else ever read the Annabel's Raven books?). I did think of teaching one of my parrots to say "Nevermore" but it just wouldn't be the same ;)
 

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At the moment he's outside all day. I give him some food in a bowl and scatter the rest so he has to actually look for it. It was fine when there were two because they could keep each other company but I think now that there is only one left I am going to have to teach him something!
 

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What a neat experience! Looks like they found the right person!

So sorry to hear you lost Midge. :( These things tend to happen when rearing wild animals. I've done wildlife rehab with bottle-fed rabbits (hardly any of them ever make it), (American) Robins, Sparrows, and Raccoons. I can be tough, but a very rewarding experience, as well.
 

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they are stunning sorry to hear about one dieing ive actualy ust been given a magpie hes a charicter and a half he was in an aviary so is stil a bit flighty but he comes and takes food from me so hopefully he will tame down a bit in the aviarys next to him were ducks and canarys so he dose both those noses :roll: :roll: hopefully i will get him saying hello and pretty bot soon :D :D
 

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Excellent lol about the duck and canary noises! Mags doesn't do anything but the magpie call at the moment - I'm hoping to start working with him and getting him talking!
 

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A friend years ago had a magpie called Maggot! he was amazing, he lived in a aviary with a load of rescued pigeons but he used to bully them and peck out all their feathers, when one of the pigeons laid eggs and Maggots ate them my friend moved him to a different aviary on his own which he unfortunately escaped from and no-one could catch him, he hung around for a whole year, he would fly down and eat from the dogs dishes.

This was a working kennels and part-time rescue centre for waifs and strays and Denise would call "Dinner Time" every night when she went out to feed the dogs in their various runs. Maggot had learned to say this plus a couple of swear words.

He would sit in the tree and say Dinner Time when he saw us preparing the dogs food in the feed shed.

He eventually just disappeared, we think the fairer sex appealed to him more, I often used to wonder if he sat in trees calling dinner time to unsuspecting members of the public
 
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