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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
These girls in a big plexi tank got caught by one of two tri 'posers' that switched from female to male. It seems to have worked out well enough. An unremarkable grouping of pinkies and fuzzies but a nice example of a communal nest. There are a couple of tri marked or splashed in the litters.





 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
All three mothers are tending to feeding, and the pinkies have milk bellies. I suspect a couple of the aunties of feeding as well as they have distinct bare circles around their nipples.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
I think the thread title says it all. But I'll 'splain it to you. These are all related females; mother, daughters, babies; I think it's OK, and I like to see natural mousie behavior. And I've found moving gravid females can result in miscarriage or premature births.
 

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The problem with that is that breeding mice in captivity is about as far from natural breeding activity (and natural selection) as possible and the fancier has to make decisions that mice in the wild would not have to. There are differing confounding variables that must be taken into account. For example:in the wild, a communal litter would not have as many babies as a communal nest in captivity due to natural deaths, predation, and so forth. Every person makes slightly different decisions as to the care of their mice, and within reason those decisions and the autonomy they imply must be respected, so I'm curious as to why you chose to let them litter together knowing they weren't close in pregnancy.

If simply moving a pregnant female results in miscarriage, she probably shouldn't be bred from in the first place since how a mouse does in pregnancy is often inheritable. Whether breeding for pets, feeders, or show, breeding resilient mice who can happily adjust to being moved a few days before pregnancy and still do well is a good thing.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
There are three litters of about four each. There's more than enough nipples between the three mothers to go around.And as to the rest, I think I know my mousies well enough to choose the correct treatment for pregnant does, thank you very much. For a doe whose never been housed alone it would be traumatic to suddenly be alone; I suppose I could hae put a pregnant doe in with one of the others who was not carrying, but I didn't, and don't , see the need for that.
 

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I heard somewhere that if mice kept in who have litters at different times will eat the smaller babies??? This isn't true? Believe it or not, I've had nightmares about making sure my pregnant does were not giving birth together, and suddenly a weight it lifted!
 

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Discussion Starter · #13 ·
These does are all very protective of the babies; I had a hard time getting pictures because they all run to the nest when I take the lid off. This is pretty typical in tanks where you have the mother and her daughters; they all act like the litter(s) is theirs. the only thing that I sometimes see is a non-nursing doe stealing some babies to make her own nest. If I saw that happening I'd remove the ones who weren't mothers. That isn't happening in this tank.
 

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Discussion Starter · #17 ·
There is indeed a curly in the litter; I never breed for any kinds of curliness, so I don't know just what kind it is. I have been a number of them since I started using Adamant as my main tri stud.

The larger babies were born larger than most of the babies born in my mousery in the last few months. Interesting as I wasn't looking for pregnancies, so the does all got the standard diet ( I guess my standard diet is pretty good...). The litters were small so I really didn't notice anything until the first litter was born. The second doe gave birth two days later, and then the third about four or five days later. the second doe looked a little pudgy before delivery, but the third didn't show at all.
 
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