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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Is it possible to cross the girl back to her dad when she hits breeding stage would there be a chance of getting the markings again? Or could this just be a blazed mousey?
 

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yes,you could try and fix the markings by breeding back to a parent or sibling.The Hereford mouse cropped up in a feeder breeder colony originally.A mouse fancier liked them and bought some and set about fixing the marking.It has only recently been standardised.No reason why you can't have a go at fixing the markings in your mouse.You would have to breed an awful lot,thats all.
 

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As Sarah said, it's a fluke like pretty much all white-spots are to a certain degree.

Even "true" hereford mice don't give "perfect" markings often. That's why I suspect that "hereford" is actually the same alleles as regular white spotting, but with a few modifiers which have become linked and are usually inherited together. Same is true for Dutch.
 

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Discussion Starter · #8 ·
Would someone be kind enough to reckonmend the best buck to pair her with so when I plan to breed her I have a good idea for what I am looking for. The Father is a Standard tan chocolate and mother is a Longcoat Fawn Brindle.

If I wanted to get more herefords exactly what am I going to look for?

Ive been told maybe crossing a blaze or headspot to her.
 

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Just to clarify there are no known "hereford" mice in Australia.
Is 'true' hereford the result of recessive white spotting?

Both parents of this mouse appeared to be self, I pulled the owner of the doe aside at last show to have a closer inspection. There was definately no white spotting. This indicates that it is indeed a recessive white spotting trait.

I got 2 silimilar looking does (with heavier spotting over the back) from an unrelated litter from a black self buck and a headspotted doe.

Is it possible the white spotting gene at play here also the gene responsible for broken and even marked mice?
Our club outlines in it's standards that headspots are desireable in both evens and brokens. Headspots and thick hereford looking blazes seems to be a common trait in these mice.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
The father was a chocolate tan and the mother was a brindle. .

I beleive that the breeder who bred Dahlia had mostly headspots in the litter.

I think Dahlia is a tan.

Just wondering who I should cross her to to get more hereford looking mice?

I would love some help
 
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