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To breed tricolours you need the splashed gene. This would need to be imported from America because we don't have it in Europe. Ay has nothing to do with tri as they don't have dominant yellow in the US (apart from a few recent imports) ;)
 

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I'm also curious about this. How do you get a splashed mouse? I am in Canada so I'm sure it's in the genes around here somewhere, not a clue where I should look for it though, but is there a way of making it?
 

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Hi

No there is no way of making it, it's a specific gene, not like a colour, for example blue, where you can create it by crossing a silver and a black and breeding back. You need to have the gene to start with or you cannot breed that kind of mouse, like with rumpwhite and dominant yellow (fawn and red). I'm sure you can get splashed mice in Canada since they are fairly common in the US. If you visit the Fun Mouse forum you will probably be able to locate a breeder near you.
 

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Oh okay, thanks. I get it now. :)

Unfortunately, there are not a lot of breeders near me. Most of the mouse breeders around here are feeder breeder, and while they take good care of their mice, they don't know anything of colour or genetics. I'll find one some day though, I hope. I'm always checking the pet stores when we go on road trips, haha.
 

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As I am in the US, I can't help you get a mousie with the tri gene(s), but I have been working with the same line as Barb at The Funmouse. Respectfully, I disagree with her theory about how this phenomenon works. Splashed is not a separate gene, but only another aspect of the 'tri' phenotype. I have gotten splashed individuals in every color I've bred to, but it is an intermediate stage that occurs after one or two generations when crossing a 'tri' carrier with a non-tri.

As I said in another post, my reading leads me to the conclusion that this 'tri' presence is more in the nature of a chimera or mosaic, in which there is a separate genetic identity that is present in the cells that produce pigment, and other locations as well. There are multiple sources online that mention the use of a line that produces individuals with multiple hues in the the black grouping (colors that are derived from the black pigment). The distribution of markings apparently shows the presence or activity of whatever disease or process the mousies were engineered for. You can also look on Wikipedia in the article about transgenics and see a picture of an agouti tri. My observation is that this transgenic factor works on all loci when breeding strictly for color and markings.

I'll post a couple of links to references a bit later.
 

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moustress said:
I have gotten splashed individuals in every color I've bred to, but it is an intermediate stage that occurs after one or two generations when crossing a 'tri' carrier with a non-tri.
If I am understanding correctly, does this suggest it may be acting as co-dom?

Thank you for this information. Very useful, indeed.
 
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