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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
This mouse (Sam) was bred when I got her from my sister, so I don't know who the father of this litter is, however if I had to guess it would be her own son.


Here is the resulting litter (5 PEW and 1 broken were culled, all males). One of the satins is male and the other female. The rest are all females. The 3 lightest appear to be PEW, but it's my understanding that himalayan/siamese mice don't get their points until later in life? So they might actually be Himalayan


Broken black tan female




Broken lilac tan female, I'm in love with her! Planning on keeping her and breeding her to my black tan satin male to work towards lilac tan satins.






ETA: For some reason, I completely forgot to put the pictures of the satin X Swarlos litters!
Here's the two very pregnant does


Both litters. The 3 biggest are from the black and white - she originally had 8 but they culled to 3 :( The next day the yellow doe gave birth to 11.


Males (not too happy with my ratio here!)


 

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Himalayan mice get their points as they mature, correct. This is called acromelanism, which means the color darkens with cooler temperatures. While young and in the nest, baby mouse bodies are at a more-or-less even temperature so they're solid-colored. In the case of Himalayan, this is white or nearly white. After they've grown, though, the ears, tails, nose, and feet develop dark points because they're the coolest parts of the body. In warm climates (even with indoor air conditioning) or with particularly poor examples, sometimes just the nose has a point, sometimes just the nose and tail.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
Very interesting - thanks Jack. I don't have air conditioning and the mature Himalayan that I have has a pink tail and the only points she has are her nose and ears (as you can see in her picture above). She is from feeder lines and might just have poor colouring, but it will be interesting to see if she goes through any colour changes as winter approaches.. One more question. Is it possible to have a Himalayan with another pattern as well? In other words, is it possible that the two broken mice from this litter could also develop points?
 

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Yes, it's possible. A mouse who is Himalayan and broken (or Himalayan and variegated, or Himalayan and rumpwhite, or what have you) will still be white (or very nearly white) over much of its body and you might not see the markings unless they happen to be over the nose or tail or other pigmented area. In winter they usually do get a little darker, with moulting.
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Updated pics - I culled males and combined the 3 litters today and snapped a shot


The broken black tan female from the Himalayan litter was WILD despite my attempts to socialize her, and kept launching off my hand or biting me. So I still have the 2 satins and the lilac tan female (all 3 are long haired). I'm debating whether or not to keep the male..

The little blue female there is from a completely different litter, but I wanted to use her in my double banded Dutch breedings, so she is in with these girls for now. Mini (my runty mouse) is also in with these ones, you can see her in the middle under the blue. The does seem to treat her as another pup, and she loves it! The 5 short hair non-satins at the bottom are the pups left from the satin litters. The fawn with the blaze and half band is the male I'm keeping.
 

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Ah you are so lucky with this surprise litter!
 

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I love the insides of that one baby's ears! The banded dove tan one in the solo pic. They're orange. At least they look orange in that pic!
 
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