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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
The only thing I can think to say about this mysterious mousie is that she carries tri, she has muted orange hair tips with very dark silver or blue at the roots. Too dark argent, I guess. (The spell checker doesn't like the extra 'e' at the end.)




Fawn satin babies @ about two weeks with mom and older sisters.






More red and yellow from Mondo and the Girlie Mousies. This mob was separated shortly after this photo shoot. There are two litters in here, about two weeks and five weeks old. The curls showed up once again in this litter. Mondo is in bachelor's quarters currently.


 

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My guess is that they're all recessive yellow (e/e) with or without varying degrees of sootiness. Often PE dilution "cleans up" the sootiness you might seen on a BE animal, which would be why the "fawn satin" babies are so bright and pretty. :)

"Tricolor" or "the tri factor" as such is not a single Mendelian trait and cannot be carried in the normal sense of the word, but you know that.

BTW, "argent" (a tincture of silver) is different word from "argente" (sometimes "argenté," a standard mouse color). Spell check often does not pick things like this up. For example, it will sometimes turn "PEW" (the mouse variety) into "pew" (like you find in church). In addition, there are similar colors in most other species of small mammal, spelled the same way. In most browsers you can adjust your settings so that "argente" is accepted. Every mouse club in the world recognizes argente, with an e, but if you leave it off accidentally it's no big deal since most people will know what you're trying to say.

The next-to-last picture is my favorite. There's a zillion of them in that frame!
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
The fawn satins probably are both ee and A^vy; the batch off of Mondo and the Girlie Mousies are largely ee and A^vy as well.
 

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moustress said:
The fawn satins probably are both ee and A^vy; the batch off of Mondo and the Girlie Mousies are largely ee and A^vy as well.
oh,if only I understood the lingo,those mice could be mine.As it is you might as well be speaking chinese.
 

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She's saying they're probably recessive yellow (e/e) and American brindle (Avy/*) at the same time.

I used to have some pet-type mice like this. Here's a couple:



They're near impossible to breed to standard, whether red or fawn, but they can be really bright orange when they're recessive yellow (e/e), American brindle (Avy/*), pink-eyed (p/p), and/or satin (sa/sa) at the same time.

At least one club has standardized this as "orange," but they're very difficult to breed to standard because of brindle's often troublesome habit of producing obese mice who have trouble reproducing (like red).
 

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thanks for the explanation,they are very attractive.I have just had four fawn brindles give birth,they have managed only three brindle babies between them and still look as though they are 21 days pregnant.
 

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Discussion Starter · #9 ·
I'm trying to breed out the obesity and the brindling, with some success so far. I have a few really deep orange meeces that have reached adulthood with out becoming oinkers, and that also have no sign of brindling. It's long term project that I've been working on for about four years now.
 

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moustress said:
I have a few really deep orange meeces that have reached adulthood with out becoming oinkers, and that also have no sign of brindling. .
I'm stashing that description :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #11 ·
I'm wondering whether breeding out the brindling could have effected the change from fatties to nonfatties. This is part of a larger question which is the effect in general of different colors on body type, size and weight. I have had no brindles appear in any of my fawn and red litters for about the last five generations, with the exception of my yellow and red tri crossings. the two lines were split off from one another right about the time I received my original tri stock, but I didn't try to cross brindles until later after I no longer had any young enough to breed and got a couple of brindles from a local store. I guess time will tell as to whether I have eliminated the brindling from the fawn and red lines.

Recently, I read that A^vy came from radiation experiments along with a lot of other types we see in fancy meeces; food for thought.
 
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