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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I have a problem with some of my mice loosing weight. For six mice they seem to eat very little. I have six girls housed in a large cage together, one of them is very dominant ( interestingly she is not thin)and I did wonder if by having the food in one area she was preventing some of them from getting to the food so I moved food dishes so that there was one on each level. However there is still loads of food left over in the morning and I still have thin mice!
I have been trying to find a corn-free mix for my mice and thanks to someone posting a link on this forum found what I was looking for at "ratRations". I am now worried that I am feeding my mice incorrectly and thats why they're thin! :(
I will list everything I feed them. I'm sorry for the long thread but I really need some sound advice as to whether I can improve what I'm feeding my mousies, if there is anything I should add or anything I should definitely not be feeding them, I'm getting really concerned.
ratRations Base mix contains;
20% Flaked Barley
20% Paddy Rice
10% Groats(bakery grade)
10% Flaked Peas
10% Flaked Wheat
10% Whole Wheat
10% Buckwheat
10% White Dari(Milo)

I then add to mix small amount of ratRations Seed Mix which contains;
30% Hemp
20% Pumpkin
20% Linseed
10% Milk Thistle
10% Fennel
10% White Quinoa

I also add smaller amounts of ;
Wholegrain Rice
Grapenuts & co-op healthy living flakes(corn free breakfast cereals)
Ryvita
James Wellbeing Turkey & Rice Puppy kibble
Safflower seeds
Brazil nut kernals

They also have Hay at all times(put in the freezer first to kill the mite) :)
 

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unlikely to be the diet thats the problem,its a good mix and wild mice are fit and well on a much poorer diet.Have you listened to their breathing closely to see if there are any signs of respiratory illness.
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
SarahC said:
unlikely to be the diet thats the problem,its a good mix and wild mice are fit and well on a much poorer diet.Have you listened to their breathing closely to see if there are any signs of respiratory illness.
Thankyou. Two of the mice who are thin have no signs of respiratory illness but my self black Inka has sneezed within 2.5 hrs of me collecting her, the breeder reassured me that he had no illness in his mice and suggested "New shed syndrome".She has always sneezed and now rattles, I have also noticed two of the mice with no weight issues sneezing from time to time, so I think she probably did have something and has given it to some of the others, however none of them have shown any signs of illness to date,(apart from not doing so well on the weight front :roll: ) they have lovely smooth,shiny coats, are active and well,they look a picture of health,it's just that some of seem to be loosing ground, it's good to know that I'm feeding them ok though.
I don't know if it's related but I have noticed that the Ivory Satin has had reddish coloured stuff round her eyes twice now?
 

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Check their teeth, sometimes the **** in the eye is a sign of over grown back teeth. :eek:
Which would also affect their appetites and weight.
 

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Discussion Starter · #5 ·
Thanks Rhasputin, I didn't know that.
Looks like it's going to be a trip to the Vet as I can't imagine how I'm going to get them to show me their teeth, Reckon it might prove a challenge for the Vet too :lol:
Does anyone have any tips for checking teeth?
 

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Depends on the mice, really.
Sometimes they'll let you check them out, sometimes they'll throw a fit. :roll:
The vet will probably hold the mouse down, and use something like a Q-tip to put between the mouse's teeth, and take a look. Or, use a very small dose of anesthesia.

You can try propping their mouth open at home (I would suggest wearing gloves, and pinning them down on a table or other flat surface where you can get a good angle) a small wooden dowel might work, something like a very thin shishkabob stick, you know? You'd probably need an extra set of hands too, and a flash light. :lol:
Tough stuff. I'd probably just take one or two of the affected mice to the vet, and have the 'pros' take a look and risk their fingers! :lol:
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thanks Rhasputin but I'm with you, a trip to the Vet is a much safer option for me and the Mice but i'm not so sure about the poor Vet :lol:
 

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dacryoadenitis ("Red Tears")

Red tears, often seen in mice and rats, can be a result of a viral disease, mycoplasmosis, or as a sign of stress. Often it is hard to tell what is actually causing the problem. The condition appears as if blood is coming from the animal's eyes. In the viral infection, usually the salivary and tear glands are involved. Because rodents have porphyrins (pigments) in their tears, any discharge will be seen as red tears. Treatment is symptomatic and involves topical eye medication.

I think it's likely your mice have an underlying problem not caused by you.Mice are very prone unfortunately
 

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The porphyrin you're describing is a not uncommon reaction to stress, so that may be as a result of them being unwell in whatever way.
 

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Discussion Starter · #10 ·
Thanks guys for all of the information, it's very welcome. :)

I don't know, I have been keeping Mice for more years than I'd care to admit(only pets) and found them relatively easy creatures to keep. I never really experienced any problems with the exception of tumours, however over the last few years the pet shop mice that I used to keep seemed to be plagued with respiratory illness.It's been so frustrating and upsetting(I get far too attached to my mice) so as they dwindled I didn't replace them and then when I was sad and mouseless, threw everything away so that I could start again from scratch - disease free!
I was thrilled to find a helpful and friendly breeder of show stock mice who was happy to sell me some lovely mice :D
Despite trying to do everything right, to the point that I think "it's really not meant to be this difficult!" of my beautiful mice, One sneezes & rattles, another sneezes, one has red tears and all of those three are a bit on the slim side! :roll:
Don't get me wrong I'm not failing to treat sick mice, as i mentioned earlier apart from their little "issues" they don't look or act like mice with acute health problems.
I just need to be sure that I am doing the very best for them. I've previously kept horses for years and looked after thoroughbreds and even their problems seemed so much easier to manage! :lol:
Anyhow that's my mega moan off my chest, sorry to go on & thanks again for the Info. :D
 

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it's well known in mice and rats and if you get books that are over 100 years old mouse keepers are going on about it.It's a real nuisance.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
Thank you. The skinny mice in question have remained the same weight since I originally posted my concerns in June except now they are looking a little older and more ragged round the edges(I know how they feel :lol: )
On looking back I do think certainly the one skinny mouse is probably that way because she's stressy, She has never settled and always looks terrified when I handle her-she definitely just tolerates it rather than enjoying coming out for a play.As for the other one it may well be health- I've had a few with the sneezes but they,ve all come though it ok but I expect the virus is still there.
They all seem to eat well now( some of them a little too well-They need to go on a diet!! :) ) :D
 

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It can be hit and miss really with the health of mice. I actually find that the smaller `pet shop types` are hardier than the larger show mice, but they still suffer from sneezing, wheezing and usually need ongoing Baytril treatments on and off at higher doses. Some mice don`t respond to baytril but that`s usually because they are either not being dosed strongly enough, or long enough. Some mice don`t react to drug therapies at all. The porphyrin stains you are seeing come from the harderian gland and are usually a sign of stress or underlying illness, like respiratory. The best thing to do is get the mice showing clinical signs onto baytril as soon as possible. My vet doses two or three drops twice daily. Keep this going until the sneezing stope because stopping the drug prematurely only allows the bacteria to recover and build up again. Especially if they have audible breathing aswell.

Your diet sounds fab! No lack of anything there as far as I can see. A really good variety of things. It could just be that they like to pick at food? Some mice are greedy beggars! Some are light eaters.

If they are kept outside, they will need a heater. If they are indoors (as mine are) good ventilation is needed, but that`s mainly due to mice kept in tanks and not barred cages.
 
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