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Eye color can be seen as soon as the meeces are born, as the skin is translucent; for fur lighter colors are usually impossible to judge unless you know the genetics of the doe and buck. White, yellow, champagne, beige; any light color won't be apparent until about 6 or 7 days. The exception might be for satin which you may see on day 5.

BTW, gold is what we call yellow satin here in the US. Yellow is not a poor red, but a color of it's own, related to but not inferior to red.
 

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We (on PetRodents) always used ivory for satin PEW's and gold for satin yellows. The American standards are newer and not the same as the English and European standards. In some parts of Europe yellow is known as straw in a light version. Folks are always jockeying to get new shades standardized, which would make things more complicated for judges. Perhaps it's an attempt to gain recognition for one's own favorite colors or shades. It's weird because standards for showing need to be stable for the colors represented, yet it's interesting to see how things have shifted. Even Finnmouse lists new shades that weren't included 10 years ago. Sand, straw, stone, and on and on. I favor color names that are descriptive of what is seen, and yellow and red are too different to both be called red. Gold is a good name for satinized yellow because it is shiny.

Now there's a rewrite of Finnmouse's section on blue mousies (a favorite of mine), and again there's an example of mousies who look blue who are actually leaden, who may look more like proper blue that actual blues. I may have to do some experimental pairings to find out. Color genetics are expanding and exploding, and I'm sure there will be a lot more surprises in the future.(And moustress- no E in the middle- slinks off to scrutinize her blue meeces to see if she has true blue or not.)

ps mild apologies for overuse of quite marks
 

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True, the generalized genotype is the same. I suspect, however, if detailed gene charts could be easily made, there would be a difference in the actual genetic fingerprint, else there would be no difference in color. The genotypes used for the purposes of designating the qualities of coats in fancy mice are very generalized. I'm sure you know there are a lot of subsets of genes that act on color and coat that are generally not used in reference to the rodents kept by hobbyists.

As far as my blue meeces are concerned you are probably right, they most likely aren't leaden because they possess every characteristic, including the flaws, typical of tru blue meeces. I'm puzzled by a diluted blue in one of my litters; it's probably a c^h in the mix; I shall have to post a photo. I got mousies from Karen, but not blues.
 

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Of the tens of thousands of genes present in the mouse genome(or any other animal genome), one tiny difference can make a big difference in appearance, or physical function or behavior. When one selects individuals for breeding based on a fixed set of criteria, one initiates the process of genetic change just as pressures in the environment initiate natural selection. Lab mice are inbred in an attempt to retain 100% of an identity needed for some experiment or research.

In other words, lab mice are forced to retain that identity whereas fancy mousies are forced to change their identity when selected for specific characteristics in order to achieve the desired end of darker fur or longer fur or whatever.

Sidebar on the subject of lab mice: I'd bet my silk pajama that lines of identical lab mice eventually experience genetic change due to bombardment by random cosmic rays or oxidation or other happenstance, and then have to be re-engineered from saved fertilized eggs.
 
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