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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
How can you tell the difference between a broken brindle and a tri colored mouse? I have some, that after seeing some posts, I'm wondering of they are broken brindle or tri. I don't have pics of them right now, I might be able to get some, but one is gray/black/white, and 2 are Orange/black/white. Does it depend on what the parent are/carry? Or is it something entirely different? Any help is appreciated!

I was thinking they are tri's... but not sure now. :)
 

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Broken brindles are made up of broken & brindle
Tri is made up of splashed,spotting(broken) and c-dilutes

The easiest way is to breed one of them to a self colored mouse, if you end up with brindles then they are broken brindles, if not then they are tri's.
Brindle is a dominant gene, so generally any time you breed a brindle, you should end up with sme brindles in the litter.

Are you in the USA or UK?

They look like broken brindles to me.
 

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the first one im not sure about but the other 2 look like broken brindles. but like windyhill said, you could breed them to a self and then you will know what they are. but you will want to make sure that the self mouse doesnt carry the broken gene. cuz then it wont really help you much. and they are cute! i like scooter :)
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Thank you!

windyhill - I live in Pa, USA.

nanette37 - Scooter is my husbands baby! He fell in love with him, and there is also a blue (self) that he likes.

I will post pics, maybe later today, of some of my other mice... anyone know how to get them clear? These pics were all clear when I took them, and when I transferred them to Photobucket, they went blurry. :oops:
 

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They're broken brindle.

"Tricolor" is a show designation only. It involves the Splashed/* gene, two c-locus dilutes, and white spotting of some sort. It is used incorrectly all the time to mean a mouse with three colors on it, but many three-colored mice are not tricolor.

The AFRMA (for example) classifies all three-colored mice as "broken multi."
 
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