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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
In my current litter (Brindle X Fawn) I got 3 brindles, 1 fawn and 4 Im not real sure about (I'll make a post about them later)
Any ways I have 1 brindle that appears to have a fox belly and so does another from the litter.
The brindle that has the white belly does have 1 black stripe on it though.

I know Brindle is dominant to just about every gene,but I also know its not fully dominant over tan. I was just wondering, is it fully dominant over fox?
if I was to breed the brindle fox, am I likely to get fox or not?

I would rather work with Fox out of this breeding since I do have another brindle litter coming up.
 

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Fox and tan involve the same a-locus allele (at). Fox involves an additional c-dilute, usually chinchilla.

If your mouse is any shade of gold or yellow on top, you don't have c-dilutes, because they would dilute the top to a shade of white. You probably have a very poor tan, which will lead to a mostly white belly and mean your brindle parent is Avy/at. I had this happen gazillions of times when I was breeding brindles, and that is part of the reason I no longer breed them. :p

Since the stripes are supposed to continue fully onto the belly, you should be able to tell whenever you have a brindle tan, but often on petstore-derived mice the stripes are too weak to make it to the belly so you may not really know if it's a brindle or a brindle tan...
 

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Discussion Starter · #3 ·
That makes sense.
The buck of the litter looked to be agouti brindle, but the 3 brindles I have now are fawn based.
The doe is a fawn.

One of the babies I thought was solid fawn,but she now has a single black stripe on her back, does that make her a really poor brindle?
2 of the brindles have markings on their bellies and one doesnt.

I would like to get some more tans, so I need to breed my brindles without markings on their bellies right?

Before I started breeding brindles, everything said it was easy to do,but Im finding outs, its not always easy,lol.
 

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I'd not use brindles to breed tans; unless you are prepared to take a couple of years to breed out the brindling; or have I misunderstood and you want to breed brindle tans? My fawn line took about four years, with A^vy to eliminate the brindling, and I still would not be surprised to see brindling pop up at any time.

I've thought about trying to breed a line of brindles that don't turn into utter oinkers, one of the same goals I've had with my fawn meeces. Fatties are fun, though, and they make great handwarmers, all lush and soft and warm.
 
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