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Discussion Starter · #1 ·


I thought I'd post a picture of a brindle buck.They are always shiny,white and have wavey fur.This is the product of two fawns.Alas he will have to be culled in the next few days to prevent suffering.It's such a shame when he's so wanted :(
 

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It is my understanding that the brindle gene (different from the American brindle) is lethal... bucks usually die before weaning.
 

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It's only brindle bucks, non brindle bucks are normal and viable. The brindle bucks die by the age of 2 weeks if left. They wobble and have a low body temperature compared to litter mates as they get older. Here are some pics of one of my previous brindle bucks (culled after the pics to prevent suffering):


 

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Wow... they just look like poor curl astrex mice!! I hope they have obvious symptoms of being poorly =o(

I am hoping to breed astrex in the future, and it would be difficult telling them apart =o/

Willow xx
 

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Brindles are not in the hands of non fanciers as far as anyone knows, and they are unlikely to let any go, certainly not to anyone who wouldn't breed them for show anyway, so you don't have to worry about them being linked to any astrex you get. The gene is dominant too, so the doe has to be a brindle to produce brindle babies.
 

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Is this something that could ever be bred out, chin rats use to years ago suffer very badly from megacolon, but over time through selective breeding it has been bred out.
 

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No, I don't think it can be bred out. Variegated mice are also supposed to be prone to megacolon but we see plenty of healthy varies about, for example. I think this is just something the body cannot cope with at all.
 

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This might be of interest:
The Mottle Brindle Mouse Syndrome is a disease in mice which mimics Menkes Syndrome in humans. Treatment of affected male mice has led to varying survival rates in mice and few attempts have led to the development of virile male offsprings in mice and none in humans. In this study the authors examined sperm produced by Brindle mice in an attempt to ascertain reasons for the observed failure of the Brindle mice to reproduce. Microscopic analysis revealed that sperm counts in these mice are higher than sperm counts of the C57/BL or the C57/6J (normal) mice. Microscopically, sperm from Brindle mice showed changes in the acrosomal and flagellum regions. Motility of these sperm were 10% to 50% that of sperm from normal mice. Biochemically, cytochrome oxidase activity was 10% to 50% of the activity seen in normal mice. Hexokinase activity and pyruvate dehydrogenase activity was equal to that observed in normal mice. These observations suggest that infertility in Brindle male mice is due to an impairment of testicular copper transport which leads to a decline in copper dependent processes.

Also:
The brindled mouse is an accurate model of the fatal human X-linked copper deficiency disorder, Menkes disease. Males carrying the mutant allele of the Menkes gene orthologue Atp7a die in the second week of life.
 

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Discussion Starter · #16 ·
They become obviously ill.I don't normally grow them on.Sods law decreed that this litter was entirely made up of brindle bucks and I don't like to leave a mother with nothing.The others have already died,this last must be the strongest.
 

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It is such as shame that they have this problem, Brindle's are pretty but obviously not for the novice mouse breeder unless they are fully aware of the problem.
 

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Discussion Starter · #18 ·
it is a shame.Then again they have been created in labs for medical science.Without the labs we wouldn't have them at all.That applies to a few mouse varieties.Pearls are another.Mice are the ultimate lab animal.I wonder if it's similar to tortoiseshell cats.They are all female,I know nothing of cat breeding though.I did have some tortoiseshell golden hamsters,again exclusively female.
 

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I understand that pearl mice are very rare within the fancy, and at risk of dying out? Do they still exisit in lab populations as well then?
 

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Thank you Sarah and Cait for posting these pics. I've always wondered what the Brindle bucks looked like. So strange that they have the wavy coat! Of course, they're just darling! It really is a shame. :( They really are so very different from our American Brindles. I think they're just beautiful! Does anyone have any Brindle doe pics? They are so lovely and I've seen so few pics of them. We don't have them over here. :(

Oh, that's such a shame, Sarah, that you didn't get any Brindle does from that litter! It reminds me a bit of breeding harlequin Great Danes. While we don't end up with non-viable males or any sex-linked issues, we always do say that it's 'not for the faint of heart'. When breeding harlequin x harlequin you can very often end up with deaf and/or blind pups. And often, if you are lucky enough to get any show-marked pups in a litter, it's usually the mismarks that have the best conformation! ;) Seems like a similar breeding endeavor to the Brindle mice! I bet it's sure worth it when you produce a stunning Brindle doe to show, though! :D

Very interesting read, as well as the pics!
 
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