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Discussion Starter · #1 ·
I recently acquired a book from 1971 titled "Enjoy your Gerbils, Rats, and Mice," by Helen Perley. It was published in Canada, the UK, and the US.

It is mostly about rats, but has sections (naturally) about gerbils and mice. It has a lot of outdated information, especially in regards to diet and bedding, but on the "Varieties" page, there was quite a bit of confusing stuff.

I've talked with a person who is perhaps this country's most respected mouse breeder, and they said that "blue red" might have been what we call argente, because of the way dark examples have deep reddish coats with blueish undercoats.

It is still pretty unclear as to what kind of mice Ms. Perley meant by "Harlequin--Cream, red, and blue mottled." There is a laboratory variety of mouse called harlequin, which can be seen here: http://www.jax.org/news/archives/2002/ackerman.html but it looks nothing like this description. In addition, there's a harlequin in rabbits, which also looks nothing like this. Do any of you have ideas?

"White-headed black" would most likely be Hereford or blazed. "Red-headed black" I am unsure of…

Here is a picture of the "Varieties" page for those interested:



Of course, most of these varieties we know. A few are confusing, though...
 

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Is it possible that 'Red-headed blacks' were a sort of Hereford? Unless they had something like a 'reverse rumpwhite' or a 'white head' :lol: back in the day, which could also be bred to be red.

Or maybe it it something similar to Tans and foxes, but the demarcation is on the head. It would have a 'fox' head if it's a white headed black, or a 'tan' head if it was a red headed black?

As Bush would say: I think that's what we call 'Speculation'.
 

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Well I'm not saying it's the 'same genes' necessarily. But the fact that it lists two colours, red and white, made me think about tans and foxes. Just a weird connection I guess. But I'd love to know exactly just what a red headed black DOES look like! :D
 

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Discussion Starter · #7 ·
Hispanics come in all colors! ;)

My ex is Afrocuban, too, and he had a weird shade of brown hair but nothing like Celia. He introduced me to Celia. It's too bad she's not with us anymore. Her voice was so powerful.



I want hair like that!
 

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Some of those colors from that book are just non-standard colors; I suspect the overly dark argent I have is a red blue, i.e. dark orangey brown tips and blue base. There are many possible colors that are nonstandard but happen nevertheless.
 

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Discussion Starter · #12 ·
One would think they have to be standardized to make it into a book, though. The author speaks of the NMC, so I'm particularly wondering if any of the British fanciers have heard these terms used. There's no corresponding list for rats or gerbils.
 

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Unfortunately I am not a breeder so have no idea if these terms are used anywhere!! Although the "red blue" term sounds like it is describing my rescue mouse Pop which moustress (thank you!) identified for me as being an overly dark argente (his top coat is almost orange but the base of all his hairs are a really dark, pretty blue.) I came across this though in regards to the Harlequin mouse so perhaps this is a relatively unknown type of colouring due to the complex nature of the genes and deficiencies involved: http://ukpmc.ac.uk/classic/articlerende ... id=1660200 (Oh how I wish my college allowed me to retain access to all these papers after I left :lol:)
 

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Maybe Red-headed Black is "Sepia" (a/a c^ch/c^ch)?

Its very possible (since so many rodents were discussed) that the author was calling the mice what the other rodent standards were called or just didn't know what she was talking about? In 1971 its not like the publisher would have been able to do much fact checking.

Its very interesting, though.
 
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